Worried about FY1? Get the FY1 Survival Pack!


Our FY1 Articles

ABG Interpretation

In this article, we will look at more practical aspects of how to read an ABG and treatment following your interpretation. If you’re looking on...

Read More

Acute Kidney Injury

AKI is very common affecting around 20% of inpatients & it is important to recognise promptly and correctly to avoid complications. In this article, we...

Read More

Anticoagulation

For new doctors, prescribing anticoagulants can be daunting. A few simple rules can make this easier. Ensure you use your local guidelines in the first...

Read More

Breaking Bad News

As a junior doctor, you will have face situations where you have to convey potentially distressing information, whether it is explaining a diagnosis or blood...

Read More

Breaks and Burnout

When I left medical school, I thought my only difficulty would be the actual medicine, which most junior doctors will tell you flies out your...

Read More

Chest X-Rays

In this article, we focus on the interpretation of a CXR. Have a low threshold to request one as they provide a lot of information...

Read More

Common Prescribing Errors

When I supervise and teach FY1s, prescribing is in the top three things they are most concerned about. Usually, they’re worried that they won’t know...

Read More

Constipation

Constipation is one of the most common complaints in hospital, especially on the geriatric wards.Failure to treat constipation can lead to longer hospital stays and...

Read More

Dealing with a complaint

As an FY1, you will receive a complaint. Usually, these are informal, "I'm unhappy with the care delivered" from a relative or the patient. I...

Read More

Death Certification

After a patient has died you may be asked to complete the death certificate. It may be issued by a doctor who has provided care...

Read More

Death Verification

As a new F1 in August, it can feel like quite a daunting task to verify a death, particularly if you have never seen this...

Read More

Delirium

Acute confusion, otherwise known as delirium, is very common in hospitals – 20-30% on medical wards and between 10% and 50% of those that have...

Read More

Deteriorating Patient

The deteriorating patient is often the worst nightmare for new FY1s.  I remember when I started FY1, I was terrified of coming across a deteriorating...

Read More

Documentation

Medical documentation should authentically represent every consultation and is primarily intended to support patient care. Good record-keeping means you or a colleague can reconstruct key...

Read More

ePortfolio

Your eportfolio is a tool to store and record evidence that demonstrates your progress, clinical competencies and reflections. Try to add to your portfolio on...

Read More

Essential Apps

Here’s a list of apps that are in order of how essential we find them. There’s probably more out there so drop us a comment...

Read More

Falls

As an F1, you will quite frequently get bleeped to review a patient who has had a fall on the ward, particularly if you are...

Read More

Fluid Balance

Almost every patient admitted to hospital receives IV fluids at some point in their journey. However, the body manages this, without the need for careful...

Read More

Handover

Handover occurs between shifts to ensure everyone is up to speed with patients. The exact nature of how it occurs varies greatly by hospital &...

Read More

Hyperglycaemia

Hyperglycaemia is something you will encounter frequently. In this article, we focus on how to approach hyperglycaemia and identify diabetic emergencies. If your patient is...

Read More

Hyperkalaemia

Hyperkalaemia can cause life-threatening emergencies particularly cardiac arrhythmias. A widely used definition is extracellular [K+] ion concentration ≥ 5.5 mmol/L. Complications increase with severity and...

Read More

Hypoglycaemia

In this article, we provide a quick overview of how to treat and investigate the cause of patients with hypoglycaemia. Definition In diabetics, <4 mmol/L...

Read More

Hypokalaemia

As an FY1 you will frequently see hypokalaemia and most trusts have guidelines that should be used in the first instance. The advice below is...

Read More

Hyponatraemia

Hyponatraemia (serum Sodium <135 mmol/L) is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities you will see and so a systematic approach to identifying the underlying...

Read More

Hypoxia

As an FY1, you will be called to review hypoxic ward patients. Here we discuss common causes of generalised hypoxia and not focal hypoxia/ischaemia such...

Read More

Leave

As an FY1 doctor, there are different types of leave you will come across during the year and the rest of your career. This article...

Read More

Mental Capacity

Mental Capacity is the ability to make your own decisions at the time at which the decision needs to be made. The mental capacity act...

Read More

Microbiology Discussions

A lot of your time as an FY1 will be spent on the phone to various other specialities. You’ll come across patients with infections in...

Read More

Nausea & Vomiting

You will frequently get calls regarding nausea & vomiting: many patients present with it or develop it because of their diagnosis or treatment. You must...

Read More

On Call Tips

FY1s are usually most apprehensive about being on call, but it is also the shift you will usually learn the most. Predominantly as an FY1...

Read More

Payslips & Income Tax

Each month, your pay and any deductions will be summarised to you in the form of a payslip. You should check your payslip every month...

Read More

Preparing for FY1

It is common for FY1s to feel anxious & feel like they’re not ready to start. We expect you to feel like this & hence...

Read More

Prescribing analgesia

When assessing pain, ensure you begin by taking a history to characterise the pain as neuropathic pain, inflammatory pain and oncological pain all respond to...

Read More

Prescribing IV Fluids

There are certain situations where you need to prescribe IV fluids which vary from fluid resuscitation to maintenance fluids if a patient is nil-by-mouth (NBM)...

Read More

Prioritising Jobs

I’m going to try and be as generic as possible so that hopefully these tips work across different specialities and settings for both in &...

Read More

Ranking Foundation Jobs

It can be difficult to know how to rank jobs for F1 when applying through FPAS & Oriel. You’re often confronted with a massive excel...

Read More

Reduced GCS

As a doctor, you will frequently be called for a drowsy patient. They can vary from confused to completely unconscious. The Glasgow Coma Scale can...

Read More

Referral Cheat Sheet

Our referral cheat sheet is our most popular resource having been downloaded thousands of times! It has key information to provide when referring to every...

Read More

Requesting scans

Requesting scans can be a scary daily occurrence for new doctors. It is one of few times where you liaise directly with a consultant. When...

Read More

Self-discharge

Frequently patients wish to self-discharge from hospitals. This article pertains to adult patients only (18y+) and these patients can be broadly split into three groups:...

Read More

Sepsis

Sepsis is an infection with evidence of organ dysfunction. Septic shock is when a patient with sepsis is hypotensive despite appropriate fluid resuscitation. ContentsIntroductionHigh-risk criteriaSepsis...

Read More

Surviving Ward Rounds

It takes time to get used to the ward round. Particularly, when patients are being seen so fast it seems impossible to document properly. The...

Read More

Writing SLEs

SLEs are supervised learning events that include Mini-CEX (mini clinical evaluation exercise) CBD (case-based discussion) DOPS (direct observation of procedural skills) These form part of...

Read More
Scroll to Top

Giveaway!

We’re giving away “Sweet & Salty” our course covering essentials in Diabetes & Electrolytes.