Category: ENT

Tinnitus

Tinnitus is a common and debilitating medical symptom encountered in the field of Otolaryngology. It is the conscious perception of auditory stimulus without the presence of external auditory stimulus and is often described by patients as a ringing, humming, pulsing or clicking sound. Tinnitus can range from a quiet background noise to loud audible sounds.

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Sore Throat

One of the most common A&E presentations is a sore throat, and while sore throat seems like a pretty straightforward complaint, it is important to properly assess and identify the cause in order to adequately treat it!   Causes of Sore Throat Common causes of sore throat: Viral tonsilitis Acute bacterial tonsilitis Glandular fever Peritonsillar abscess

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Vertigo

Vertigo is described as an “abnormal sensation of motion. It can occur in the absence of motion or when motion is sensed inaccurately”1 Assessing a patient with vertigo can be challenging, even for experienced clinicians. Patients often use the words “vertigo” and “dizziness” synonymously to describe their symptoms, but the sensations they are experiencing can

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Thyroid Disease

As a junior, you will frequently see patients who potentially have thyroid dysfunction. The problem is these patients often present with quite generalised symptoms and you may struggle to know when to send TFTs and what to do when they’re abnormal. Thyroid dysfunction is incredibly common (about 2.5% of the population) with the majority of

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ENT Emergencies

In this article, we cover the main ENT situations you are likely to encounter either in A&E, during an ENT on call job or occasionally as a ward emergency. ENT cases can be exciting but slightly daunting, particularly due to the number of specialty-specific presentations and practical procedures to become familiar with as well as

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Epistaxis

Epistaxis is a common presentation, especially amongst the young and elderly population. Knowing the basic management, red flags, and when to escalate is important particularly in acute situations! A bit of background Epistaxis can have an anterior or posterior source; the majority of bleeds originate anteriorly from Kiesselbach’s plexus (Little’s area) Posterior bleeds generally arise

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